Ryan Johnson-Hunt's Comments

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At 23:59 on July 27, 2011,
Shrafter
Jamie
said…

Hi Ryan.

Just having a nosey around at the moment.

Seems like you've done a great job getting this site up and running!

Thanks for doing so, I can tell I'm going to get a lot from it and hopefully help some folk out also.

At 9:51 on July 18, 2011,
Shrafter
Rania Marsh
said…

There are two main areas to do overnighters or weekenders in, the Waitakere ranges, and the Hunua Ranges, both in Auckland, and both relatively accessible. 

I'd like to add these to the Bushcraft map, but I'm not sure how. Will have to experiment. 

Above all, don't lose hope, or let go of the Dream, Ryan. Remember the old saying, 'From small acorns, mighty oaks grow'?

Stay tight, brother.

At 17:12 on July 17, 2011,
Shrafter
Rania Marsh
said…

Hi Ryan. I haven't unfortunately taught bushcraft to anyone here or overseas, only to my nephews and a couple of mates. I, like a few others, have skills and abilities accumulated through hands-on experience, and I too wanted to start my own school but have not known where to start or where to go to get the required information. I am convinced, though, that if enough of us got together and nutted this out, pooled our knowledge and skills, we could get enough of a headstart to get a NZ Bushcraft school up and running. If other people get serious about this, I'm in 100%!

 

At 16:30 on July 6, 2011,
Newbie
lillianfougere
said…
Cheers for the welcome I'm just learning so... keen on little bits here and there! Great site, awesome work! All the best, Lillian.
At 14:26 on June 21, 2011,
Tohunga
John Pilgrim
said…
Thank You! I appreciate the welcome! I hope to both learn and contribute to your website!
At 19:28 on June 8, 2011,
Newbie
tony
said…

Thanks for the welcome, Ryan. I'm really just tipping my toe in, at this point. I'm sure we're all going to have to learn/relearn a lot of primitive skills, in the not too distant future. This seems like a good site to start that process.

 

Tony

At 23:06 on May 29, 2011,
Newbie
suburbanbushwacker
said…

Hi Ryan

Great site mate, my brother is already living in NZ, but i've never been

hope to make it down there sometime in the next couple of years.

Regards

Sten AKA SBW

 

At 23:26 on May 15, 2011,
Shrafter
Kevin England
said…

 

Most of my experience comes from some fishing, car camping and spending time reading a lot.I grew up in central Texas and you don't have a big opportunity to practice a lot.I now live in Idaho and there is much more flexibility.I want to learn as much as i can.any tips  would be appreciated. I will be posting some of my pictures in the near future.this is an excellent site. Thanks for the friend invite.

Without copying the total entry i guess i can say member Bill Ross has an entry on may 12th and the first part of that  is pretty true for myself.

Thanks Again

Kevin

At 12:50 on May 12, 2011,
Newbie
Elaine Doherty
said…

Cheers for that Ryan,

I will join the bushcraft library and have a look.

I definitely agree with you r.e. outdoor skills-  great for building self-esteem in little people.

Ta

Elaine

 

At 10:30 on May 12, 2011,
Shrafter
Bill Ross
said…

I've always maintained that NZ can provide and sustain anyone who wants to try the alternative to urban living. I have a bit of a desire to go bush for a while and test myself. It's been 20 years since I did anything remotely challenging regarding bushcraft and it's an itch I need to scratch! I guess it has been stimulated by Ray Mears and other 'survival" programmes and also coming across an old book on personal survival that was an SAS manual. Of course, reality differs from the TV stuff and I know from experience that it is a lot tougher than presented in crafted docos and programmes on TV. I'm not a hunter and I don't shoot but I have extensive fishing and some trapping experience. Hoping I can glean some tips and ideas from the site and members. 

I need extend my knowledge of NZ trees, plants and wildfood resources and refresh my fungus knowledge. If I'm going to do this journey I want to be fully prepared! 

 

One step at a time and I intend to prepare by taking  several three and four days trips to acclimatise myself. 

 

Site looks great and I am sure I will be an active participant if blogs/forum etc with the inevitable questions galore.

 

Forgot to mention that I did an outdoor bound survival course in Scotland in the 80's where I had to live for a week with no food or shelter on a tiny uninhabited  island off the coast of Scotland. Got though it but was rather wet cold and smelly at the end of the week! The satisfaction was immense and I think I want to get that feeling again.

At 10:58 on May 11, 2011,
Newbie
Elaine Doherty
said…

Hi Ryan,

No probs. I am very interested in the active outdoors - major activities mountain running, tramping, cycling. I have limited bushcraft skills - (can read maps, and normal camping/tramping skills). However, I have a wee 6 month old and wish to learn more 'natural' skills to share with my daughter at some point in the future. I think it's important in this current climate that I learn and teach my child as many of these skills as possible.

Cheers

 

At 14:43 on May 9, 2011,
Newbie
Elaine Doherty
said…

Cheers Ryan,

Elaine

At 8:46 on May 9, 2011,
Shrafter
barnsey
said…

Hi Ryan,

I decided to build one after watching the impressive video  on your site of one being carved with a machete. I thought i'd start with pvc tube and manuka piston, assumung that manuka was a dense wood. After some fiddling  i constructed very good seal on the piston. Ignition was random 1 in 20 goes. The  i heard a very small fart,and discovered a small puff of air coming out the handle end of the piston. Under the extreme pressure generated air was being forced down the miniscule tubes in the manuka,all the way to the handle. Some epoxy glue on the nose fixed that. She is now a working piston.

At 22:57 on May 8, 2011,
Shrafter
Laird brent henson
said…

Hi all

im based in the wellington area (wainuiomata )to be exact so well located regards getting out in the bush i am a member of the Hutt Valley Tramping club and get out quite often both on club trips and solo  in the Tararuas,Ruahines and the Rimutakas  if theres any other members located in the hutt valley area looking for tramping partners even just day trips locally get in touch .

At 10:07 on May 7, 2011,
Shrafter
Les Ryan
said…

Hi there Ryan. Les here from the bottom of the north Island. Just joined and will contribute when I can. I was going for a hunt today but cant find my wet suit or flippers. Most of the North island is no doubt getting the same wet as us. catch up with you soon, Les

 

At 20:01 on March 28, 2011,
Newbie
Sean Joseph Delany
said…
Kia ora raa Ryan. Sean Delany here from Motueka. Recently my son and I have been getting into bushcraft which maybe due to the fact that we have been watching 'Ray Mears Bushcraft!' I grew up in the Far North in Te Kao where bushcraft wasn't strong however skills and traditions around the waterways and sea where passed down. Over the past two years, I have been involved in a contemporary and traditional food gathering and preparation course called "Mai i te Whenua, Moana ki te Tepu - From the Land and Sea to the Table". Basically it has been about teaching people how to feed themselves with whatever resources are in their area e.g. netting fish, eeling, diving, gardening, bottling, making bread, processing wild pork (sausages, patties, bacon both traditional and commercial, ham traditional and commercial as well as pickled pork), drying shark, identifying Maaori rongoa (medicine) and other traditional foods etc... That old knowledge has been a Godsend for my whaanau and I especially with the rising food prices! My son Asher and I are doing a research project on traditional Maaori methods of fire-lighting. To date, the Samoan method seems to be the one that we will focus on. I believe the old method was similar. Anyway, if you have any tips, flick them this way. We look forward to hearing from you. Noho ora mai
At 12:42 on March 14, 2011,
Shrafter
Nadia
said…

Yeah, I'm not in a hurry to hit the turnips again for a while aye.. especially with there being much better things afoot.  Gems like peaches, pears, feijoas, grapes, crab apples, walnuts, acorns, plus the mushroom season is starting to get warmed up. Rellies from just out of town tell me duck's in season too - yum. 

So far, I've been using and contributing to the NZ Wild Foods Map - another Google map that's been set up to exchange wild food related spots if you're interested: New Zealand Wild Foods Share Map - Google Maps (for people in Christchurch & Canterbury there's also the Otautahi Urban Foraging Map: Urban Foraging - Google Maps). Not sure, but there may even be some way to integrate the bushcraft map with theirs?

Incidentally, I just finished watching Roy Mears' series called "Wild Food" online: YouTube - Dafidd's Channel which he did for the BBC - he also has several others apparently which I haven't watched yet, one called Bushcraft. Now I finally think I'm starting to get why flint and firecraft are so fascinating - and handy to be cooking foraged treats on the go. I also found out that you can dry and carry certain kinds of fungi to use as cool little, long-smouldering firelighters.

I also found a specialist knife recently which I want to get hold of that isn't sold in NZ (designed for mushrooming )- is the trading post the best place on the site to post a pic to see if someone on there would be able to make one (and how much it might be)?

At 9:21 on March 3, 2011,
Shrafter
Nadia
said…

Classic - that was one mystery (who built it) that I didn't think would be answered. If that's what you can throw up in half a day I'm definitely picking up bushcraft tips from the right crowd - it was quite flash from what I recall. 

 

And no- we didn't find any mushrooms up there at the time, but the subdivision is a good place for skating while it's closed off to cars, plus I discovered some giant wild turnips growing in some of the undeveloped section lots. I think they might have been wild left overs from an old farmers markets that used to be held around there in the past. Some were bigger than a basketball, so I still think of that location as pretty bountiful!

 

Though for a while there it was: turnip chips, baked turnip, turnip gratin, turnip soup, etc.. Turns out you really can have too much of a good thing.

 

At 10:58 on March 1, 2011,
Shrafter
Nadia
said…

Cheers for the welcome Ryan :) Looks like you have created a cool little community here - I'm happy to be part of it. I'm sure it will be onto it networks of like minded souls like this who rebuild society over hammies and smoke signals, if the grid goes down one day. ;)

PS. Had a look at the Bushcraft Spots Auck Google map. Now I'm wondering - was it your hut - or someone's off this forum that I discovered while mushrooming in the pines near the quarry/subdivision development in Mount Welli??? Lol, very bizarrely small world if so! I thought at the time (last autumn) that perhaps the contractors had built themselves a secret smoko spot!

At 2:23 on December 31, 2010,
Newbie
Gareth
said…
thanks mate looking forward to learning heaps and contributing some of my own knowledge to the site. Happy newyear

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