How to enjoy a Steak and Kumara dinner in the bush

Ok,

Anyone can rough it in the bush and TBH a lot of us will have tried Backcountry freezedry meals ( Roast lamb + Veggies is my favourite)..

But a trip out with some real food is nice once in a while so here is how to prepare a Steak and Kumara dinner.

Ok find a good site for your fire...




I tend to use the similar technique each time for my fire lay..

I start by clearing where I'm going to have the fire.. Then a base of thumb thick twigs to act as a base then lots of thin dry twigs.... I often use wood shavings or feathersticks to act as kindling and really fine shavings to act as tinder to catch a spark from a ferrocerium rod.... I also like to split wood... All of the above is how I 'do' it. It's not right or wrong but I enjoy the ritual and also get to practice skills and use my knife a bit... TBH a bit of innertube and a BIC lighter would have the same effect...

Below is my fire lay and I've split down some Kahikatea to act as kindling / fuel for stage 2 when the fire is established...



Here I've introduced the flame into my tinder and fire is begining to get established....


After a short while it's on with the thicker kindling / fuel.

I've used a teepee style fire lay here but there are lots of different fire lays you could use.


In the background is some of my fuel supply for later a good distance from the fire. Some of it is sawn. I really like the combination of a folding saw and fixed blade knife as you can keep a campfire for one fed with these two tools.

Ok onto the cooking...

Kumara is simple once the fire has an established ember bed you can place the Kumara in the embers.. I used tin foil but you could be more creative and use all sorts I guess....



Once the Kumara has been in the fire a while next comes the steak...

Cooking on an open fire is great and a lot of cooking doesn't require lots of flames often an ember bed is better.
I took along a Cast Iron Skillet. Cast Iron is great to cook on on a fire as it heat evenly and holds it's heat..

So onto the embers went the pan and in the pan went the steak...



The skillet is well 'seasoned' and non stick so the steak can cook in it's own fat....

At the oppertune time remove the Kumara and enjoy the Steak....


After that you can add more wood to the fire and as night falls dream by the fire with a full belly...


Next day you have to police up the fire and water down the ashes and clean up the fire site...


Leaving the area as you found it with no trace of a fire....


That's a bushcraft way to cook a steak dinner in the bush...

Enjoy...

John

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Shrafter
Comment by Shaun Jordan on August 29, 2012 at 21:23

Thanks for posting this tutorial I liked how you kept it simple and had excellent pictures to show, good job.

That looked like my kind of meal very adaptable for other meals too.

Definitely gioing to try this.


Tohunga
Comment by Te Hopo on April 8, 2012 at 9:07

I'm a big fan of good food in the bush and so I always carry at least a few spuds and tinfoil.

What really makes them heaven is carrying those little single serves of butter, one of those on a baked spud, some salt and pepper and ahhhhhhh relax with a feed.

Good idea on the vacuum packed meat, will have to take a steak or two on my next trip.


Tohunga
Comment by John Swarbrick on August 4, 2010 at 22:09
Ryan,

Talbert is 100% correct... We have a very friendly local butcher who vacumn packs the meat..

Saves any mess or bother...

Newbie
Comment by Talbert de Jong on August 3, 2010 at 18:35
@Ryan You can buy the vaccuum packed Meats in supermarket the plastic is quite thick

Shrafter
Comment by Bill Raymond on August 3, 2010 at 18:17
That looks great! I do tend to use the back-country meals on a tramp to save weight but for camping real food is way better. Some of the best meals I've eaten have been cooked over a fire although I'm sure the atmosphere added to it.

Admin
Comment by Ryan Johnson-Hunt on July 27, 2010 at 22:01
Thanks for that John, well done. Just out of interest, how do you usually transport the raw meat? I am always scared of blood leaking through my kit!

Great that you included the clean up, to me it is a very important part.

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